Yemen

September 2022

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Mínima
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Se estima que seria al menos una fase peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada
La manera de clasificación que utiliza FEWS NET es compatible con la CIF. Un análisisque es compatible con la CIF sigue los protocolos fundamentales de CIF pero nonecesariamente refleja el consenso de los socios nacionales en materia de seguridad alimentaria.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

1: Mínima
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada
La manera de clasificación que utiliza FEWS NET es compatible con la CIF. Un análisisque es compatible con la CIF sigue los protocolos fundamentales de CIF pero nonecesariamente refleja el consenso de los socios nacionales en materia de seguridad alimentaria.
Para los países de Monitoreo Remoto, FEWS NET utiliza un contorno de color en el mapa CIF que representa la clasificación más alta de CIF en las áreas de preocupación.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurida d Alimentaria Aguda

Países presenciales:
1: Mínima
2: Acentuada
3: Crisis
4: Emergencia
5: Hambruna
Países de monitoreo remoto:
1: Mínima
2: Acentuada
3+: Crisis o peor
Se estima que seria al menos una fase
peor sin ayuda humanitaria actual o programada
Para los países de Monitoreo Remoto, FEWS NET utiliza un contorno de color en el mapa CIF que representa la clasificación más alta de CIF en las áreas de preocupación.

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée
La manière de classification que FEWS NET utilise est compatible avec l’IPC. Une analyse qui est compatible avec l’IPC suit les principaux protocoles de l’IPC mais ne reflète pas nécessairement le consensus des partenaires nationaux en matière de sécurité alimentaire.

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée
La manière de classification que FEWS NET utilise est compatible avec l’IPC. Une analyse qui est compatible avec l’IPC suit les principaux protocoles de l’IPC mais ne reflète pas nécessairement le consensus des partenaires nationaux en matière de sécurité alimentaire.
Pour les pays suivis à distance par FEWS NET, un contour coloré est utilisé pour représenter la classification de l’IPC la plus élevée dans les zones de préoccupation.

IPC 2.0 Phase d'Insécurité Alimentaire Aiguë

Pays de présence:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Urgence
5: Famine
Pays suivis à distance:
1: Minimale
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pire
Serait probablement pire, au moins une phase, sans
l'assistance humanitaire en cours ou programmée
Pour les pays suivis à distance par FEWS NET, un contour coloré est utilisé pour représenter la classification de l’IPC la plus élevée dans les zones de préoccupation.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência humanitária em vigor ou programad
A maneira de classificação que utiliza FEWS NET é compatível com a CIF. A análise compatível com a CIF segue os protocolos fundamentais da CIF mas não necessariamente reflete o consenso dos parceirosnacionais com respeito a segurança alimentar.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad
A maneira de classificação que utiliza FEWS NET é compatível com a CIF. A análise compatível com a CIF segue os protocolos fundamentais da CIF mas não necessariamente reflete o consenso dos parceirosnacionais com respeito a segurança alimentar.
Para os países de Monitoreo Remoto, FEWS NET utiliza um contorno de cor no mapa CIF para representar a classificação mais alta da CIF nas áreas de preocupação.

CIF 2.0 Fase de Insegurança Alimentar Aguda Baseado

Países com presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3: Crise
4: Emergência
5: Fome
Países sem presença:
1: Minima
2: Stress
3+: Crise ou pior
Poderia ser pior sem a assistência
humanitária em vigor ou programad
Para os países de Monitoreo Remoto, FEWS NET utiliza um contorno de cor no mapa CIF para representar a classificação mais alta da CIF nas áreas de preocupação.

September 2022

October 2022 - January 2023

IPC v3.1 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
Key Messages
  • Amid current reductions in humanitarian food assistance, households face significant difficulty purchasing sufficient food to fulfill their kilocalorie needs due to the impact of above-average food prices on household purchasing power. Millions of poor households are likely experiencing food consumption gaps. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Crisis! (IPC Phase 3!) outcomes are likely widespread, and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes are currently expected in Hajjah, Marib, Lahj, and Abyan during the agricultural off-season. By November, seasonal improvements in access to food and income from the main harvest and slight increases in humanitarian assistance rations will likely improve area-level outcomes to Crisis! (IPC Phase 3!) in Hajjah, Lahj, and Abyan. However, Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes are expected to persist in Marib given the large population of displaced households with high dependence on assistance.

  • In July and August 2022, around 7.3 million and 3.0 million people, respectively, were assisted with general food assistance (GFA) by WFP as part of the fourth distribution cycle. In mid-September, WFP announced a slight increase in ration size for the fifth distribution cycle.[1] With this, most beneficiaries will receive rations equivalent to around 65 percent of one month’s energy requirements per distribution, compared to less than 50 percent in the previous cycle. Beneficiaries will also continue to be reached on a less-than-monthly basis (about once every six weeks) such that assistance rations will support around 40 percent of households’ monthly energy requirements, on average, compared to around 30 percent in the previous cycle. Beyond this, in some areas, beneficiaries will be expected to share any assistance received. According to key informants, the fifth distribution cycle has started in some areas as of late September.

  • Funding shortfalls have put more crucial humanitarian interventions at risk of either reduction or closure. As of late September, the Food Security and Agriculture Cluster of the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan was only 49 percent funded, and the Nutrition, Health, and WASH clusters were 32, 64, and 23 percent funded, respectively. These clusters provide services that help prevent and treat acute malnutrition, including by supporting sanitation and health. With recent flooding causing damage to water and sanitation systems — likely increasing the risk of waterborne diseases — reductions in access to health services will likely render households more vulnerable to the physiological impacts of concurrent high levels of acute food insecurity and contribute to increased rates of acute malnutrition in many areas. In Marib, over 258,000 individuals will be left without healthcare in September 2022. Meanwhile, though WFP’s school-feeding program resumed with the start of the new term in late July/early August, only around one third of the originally planned 1.9 million children will be reached in the current semester due to funding shortfalls.

  • In IRG-controlled areas, food prices remain high despite recent improved imports and relative stability of the local currency, likely attributable to high global prices at the time when the food was imported. In August 2022, the cost of the Minimum Food Basket (MFB) in Aden city reached 128,941 YER, according to data from FAO. This is the highest price recorded since December 2021 and is eight percent higher than the peak recorded in March 2022 following the Ukraine crisis. On the other hand, the cost of the MFB in the SBA reference market of Amanat al Asimah (Sana’a city) has declined by 19 percent since peaking in April/May 2022, likely attributable to improved food and fuel imports through the Red Sea ports. However, the cost of the MFB remained notably higher than in August 2021 in both Aden and Amanat al Asimah, by 62 percent and 18 percent, respectively.

  • Many poor households are still struggling to cope with the impacts of flooding in August, which caused widespread damage to household assets and disruption to livelihoods. In Al Jawf, for example, hundreds of livestock drowned in the floods, resulting in significant losses for many families who depend on livestock as a main source of food and income. Similarly, hundreds of grape vines were damaged in Bani Hushaesh and Khowlan districts of Sana’a governorate, with many farmers losing some or all of their grape harvest. Crops and fruit trees were damaged in many other areas as well — compromising farmers’ ability to earn income — and wet conditions are likely encouraging a resurgence of several plant and animal diseases. For instance, Fall Armyworms were recently reported in Sa’dah, Al Hudaydah, Ibb, Amran, and parts of the northern districts of Sana’a, threatening cereal crops such as sorghum, maize, millet, barley, and wheat.   

  • Despite ongoing discussions to extend the ceasefire agreement, media sources are reporting increased violence in September. Conflict incidents — including drone and shelling attacks that target civilian homes and farms and cause forced displacement — have been reported in many areas, including Marib, Hajjah, Taizz, Al Dhale’e, Al Bayda, and Al Hudaydah governorates. These events signal growing tensions between parties to the conflict, which could compromise further extension of the current truce. 


    • [1] 50 kilograms of wheat flour, 4 liters of cooking oil, and 3.5 kilograms of beans compared to 40kg of wheat flour, 3.7 L of cooking oil, and 3 kg of beans received by many beneficiaries in the previous cycle

Food Security

Yemen Food Security Classification (September 2022 - January 2023)

Near term (September 2022 - September 2022) food security outcomes and forward-looking analysis representing the most likely food security outcomes for medium term (October 2022 - January 2023) periods.

Downloads

Weather, Climate, and Agriculture

Seasonal Calendar

Markets & Trade

Price Watch
Price Bulletin
November 2022
Cross Border Trade Report

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics