Key Message Update

Inflation on food prices continue to rise despite the start of the harvest

September 2021

September 2021

Phase 2 de l'IPC

October 2021 - January 2022

Phase 1 de l'IPC

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Mauritania is structurally dependent on imports and the annual agricultural production is insufficient to cover all household food needs. Current demand for primary staple foods remains high and constant for imported products, especially rice, wheat, sugar and pasta. This is particularly relevant now during the lean period and even more so in agropastoral, pastoral and rainfed crop areas. Stressed food insecurity (IPC Phase 2) is observed in these areas.

  • Market supply of basic food products is moderately stable compared to previous months, as are the internal and outgoing flows of commercial imports mainly from Europe and Asia. Internal demand for staple foods continues to follow the trend of previous months with an unusual rise in prices despite ongoing negotiations between the government and economic operators to regulate the markets. Purchasing power of the poorest households remains strongly subject to the distribution of cash and staple foods from humanitarian organizations, which is still significantly lower than that of an average year due to the reduction in humanitarian aid funds following the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, government operations to sell food products at moderate prices through the establishment of subsidy programs are continuing and facilitating access to food.

  • Internal and external flows of livestock are low with price increases in all markets and for all animal species. This is a typical seasonal phenomenon dictated by strategic decisions for managing the flow of livestock (in order to reduce losses and shortfalls). Furthermore, the spatial distribution of rainfall has not been optimal in certain pastoral areas, particularly the Hodhs, Adrar and Assaba regions. Pastoral resources there are limited, thus putting future pressure on the available resources in the regions further south, particularly in Gorgol and Guidimakha.

  • As the end of the rainy season comes to a close, income levels for poor households should not see big changes compared to the previous month. However, in other agricultural and agropastoral areas, activities have gotten off to a promising start, leading to an increase in income, especially the date harvest, which constitutes an important source of income for poor households. These favorable rainfall conditions have increased pastoral resources, thus improving the physical condition of animals, which in turn increases animal production and raises the price of animals, especially externally (in Senegal, Mali, etc.) as well as internally. In the rest of the country, cash and food distributions by humanitarian organizations are continuing, but they are expected to end in late September, causing household incomes to drop in the coming months.

  • The health situation linked to the COVID-19 pandemic has improved with a drop in the average number of daily cases (from around 193 to 96 from September 3 to 16 according to official figures). Mauritania has the highest vaccination coverage rate of the total population in the region at around 13 percent. However, the pandemic has had an impact on the national economy, affecting income for the poorest households and those in particular in the informal sector. The COVID-19 vaccination campaign has made improvements in the health situation, leading to a reduction in restrictive measures, particularly the curfew that was lifted on September 28th across the country.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics