Key Message Update

The Ukrainian crisis is exacerbating the rise in food prices

May 2022

May 2022

June - September 2022

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The low purchasing power of poor households is severely limiting their ability to access food. However, the introduction and continuation of the program of Emel and TEMWINE stores selling staple foods at prices subsidized by the state and its partners are facilitating access to food among poor households in rural, peri-urban, and urban areas. A large proportion of these households will be Stressed (IPC Phase 2), particularly in rainfed, agropastoral, and pastoral areas. Nevertheless, during the lean season from April through June, some households will likely be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

  • Market supplies of staple foods remain normal. Prices of imported products are up significantly compared to last year and to the five-year average. In the Ould Yende and Mbagne markets, in March 2022 the prices of sorghum and wheat were respectively about 75 percent and 65 percent higher than the two-year average. Food price increases in the markets are due to the decrease in supply following the latest harvests, high seasonal demand (pastoral lean season), the increase in global exchange rates of raw materials, and the persistence of high shipping costs. These atypical price increases are further accentuated by the crisis in Ukraine, which is pushing the prices of imported food products – including wheat, sugar, vegetable oil, pasta, and milk powder – up even higher.

  • Pastoral resources are somewhat limited in this pastoral lean season. Transhumance movements from deficit areas in the north to areas in the south in search of pasture are continuing throughout the country. Demand for livestock feed is high compared to last month and to an average year. In addition, the price of both local and imported livestock feed is up compared to the average due to higher-than-usual demand from sedentary and urban livestock farmers.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics