Special Report

Markets in northern Mali adequately supplied

October 2012

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.
Partners: 
WFP
European Commission
UK Aid
Sida
Cooperazlone Italiana alo Sviluppo
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
UNICEF
UNHCR
CHF Somalia

Key Messages

  • Throughout the Sahel, local cereal prices remain higher than the five‐year average. However, following typical seasonal trends, prices were stable or began decreasing in September with the increased availability of maize from coastal countries and in anticipation of this year’s harvest. For rural households, food needs are increasingly met through early season crops and wild foods.

  • Conflict and subsequent localized civil insecurity during the first half of 2012 severely disrupted normal trade flows that typically support cereals supply in Northern Mali. However, the marketing system adapted to these changes and quickly increased the importance of otherwise tertiary market systems (e.g., Algeria).   Adequate supplies of staple foods continue to be available on markets.

  • Household purchasing power has improved since August with the reestablishment of informal cash transfer systems and livestock trade flows and with the increased availability income earning opportunities. The seasonal availability of wild foods, early season harvests and livestock products as well as the availability of humanitarian assistance have further improved household food access. Physical access to markets is only occasionally disrupted due to localized conflict. 

  • Between October and December, IPC Phase 3: Crisis levels of food insecurity in Zone 6 (Niger Delta Lakes) and Zone 3 (Fluvial Rice and Transhumant Livestock Rearing) should gradually improve to Stress (IPC Phase 2) with the September‐December cereal harvests, increases in income earning opportunities, and with the expansion of humanitarian assistance programs in the north. IPC Phase 2: Stress levels of acute food insecurity in agro‐pastoral areas, particularly in Zone 4 (Millet and Transhumant Livestock Rearing) will evolve to minimal levels of food insecurity (IPC Phase 1) as market dependence decreases.

     

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About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics