Special Report

Reduced food availability in the north

February 2013

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Staple foods are available and continue to circulate in northern Mali, even though marketing systems have been greatly affected by the escalation of conflict since January 2013. With the exception of Kidal, traders continue to supply most of the north, though less frequently and at lower levels than usual. 

  • The typical, seasonal downward trend in cereal prices ended prematurely in mid-January in the north, following conflict-related disruptions to the marketing system (Figures 2 to 4). The magnitude and potential effects of these price increases are especially worrisome in urban areas where remaining local food stocks are low.

  • In early February 2013, significant cereal stocks were available among traders in Mopti who typically supply northern markets. High levels of insecurity currently discourage large trade volumes towards northern Mali, although trader stocks in key source markets are sufficient to meet staple food needs in northern markets if commercial activity along the major marketing corridors resumes. 

  • Physical access constraints and/or the absence of traders or stocks on markets in northern Mali could lead to the rapid deterioration of food security among pastoralists, who are completely market-dependent to meet their staple food needs. Assuming the continuation of market disruptions and poor humanitarian access in pastoral zones, Crisis (IPC Phase 3) is expected by early April due to shortages on key markets, restricted movement, and the onset of the pastoral lean season.

     

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About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics