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Good harvests and price stability contribute to continued minimal food insecurity

  • Remote Monitoring Report
  • Guinea
  • March 2014
Good harvests and price stability contribute to continued minimal food insecurity

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  • Key Messages
  • Projected outlook through June 2014
  • Key Messages
    • Above-average harvests leading to good national cereal availability, as well as good availability of income-earning activities, continue to maintain good food security conditions.
    • Cereal and tuber availability is normal and sufficient to meet demand in most markets, which is likely to result in stable food prices along seasonal trends in the region. This stability is also maintaining poor households' access to typical foods.
    • These factors are allowing most households to meet their essential needs without resorting to negative coping strategies. As a result, Minimal acute food insecurity will be maintained through June 2014.

    Zone

    Current anomalies

    Projected anomalies

    There are no anomalies liable to have a major impact on food security at this time or expected during the outlook period. 

     


    Projected outlook through June 2014

     In general, the above-average rice harvests for 2013/2014 and harvests of market garden crops are continuing to ensure good food security conditions. Widespread income-generating activities, such as land preparation, sales of crops and forest products, and poultry sales are producing normal levels of income, which is helping to strengthen household purchasing power and helping them to meet food and non-food expenses.

    There were normal, regular market supplies of locally produced foodstuffs such as rice, maize, onions, yams, palm oil, eggplants, dry peppers, fonio, etc. for the month of March. Prices for domestic and imported rice on most markets tracked by FEWS NET were generally stable between January and February, due to increasing supply and stable demand. This price stability should continue through April-May, at which point prices could edge slightly upwards in line with normal seasonal trends, with the heavier household demand on markets as households deplete their food stocks, as is normal.

    There is still adequate pasture and water availability in pastoral areas across the country, enabling pastoral households to engage in activities such as the selling of livestock and animal products, generating normal levels of income. Terms of trade are in favor of pastoralists, which is facilitating their food access.

    Over 80 percent of households in most livelihood zones are able to protect their livelihoods with the normal levels of income produced by income-generating activities such as sales of off-season crops, sales of food crops and forest products, and land preparation activities. This will maintain acute food insecurity at Minimal levels (Phase 1, IPC 2.0) through the month of June.

    Figures Seasonal calendar in a typical year

    Figure 1

    Seasonal calendar in a typical year

    Source:

    Figure 1. Prix du kg du riz local en GNF sur les principaux marchés suivis en Guinée

    Figure 2

    Figure 1. Prix du kg du riz local en GNF sur les principaux marchés suivis en Guinée

    Source:

    Figure 2. Prix du kg du riz importé en GNF sur les principaux marchés suivis en Guinée

    Figure 3

    Figure 2. Prix du kg du riz importé en GNF sur les principaux marchés suivis en Guinée

    Source:

    Figure 4

    Source:

    In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

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