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Off-season harvests strengthen food security

  • Remote Monitoring Report
  • Guinea
  • January 2014
Off-season harvests strengthen food security

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  • Key Messages
  • Projected outlook through June 2014
  • Key Messages
    • Above-average ongoing harvests of rainfed crops and, in some cases, the first harvests of off-season crops are strengthening food security conditions by providing households with a diversified supply of food.
    • Markets are functioning normally. Prices for locally grown and imported rice were stable between November and December due to the arrival of newly harvested crops on local markets, relatively stable rice prices on world markets, and average local demand.
    • Stable prices and average incomes will improve poor households’ access to staple foods and will enable them to meet their food needs without any major difficulties during the entire 2013/2014 consumption year (October 2013 to September 2014). As a result, Minimal (IPC Phase 1) acute food security outcomes will continue through at least June 2014.

    ZONE

    CURRENT ANOMALIES

    PROJECTED ANOMALIES

    There are no anomalies expected to have a major impact on food security at this time or during the remainder of the outlook period.

     


    Projected outlook through June 2014

    There was a clear improvement in household income levels and the availability of cereal crops, such as rice and maize, between December and January due to the ongoing harvests of rainfed and flood-recession crops in surplus-producing areas and due to widespread off-season cropping activities. For this off-season, the first harvests of certain vegetables, such as tomatoes, endive, carrots, and lettuce have begun in localized areas. National 2013/14 cereal production was estimated at 3,430,591 metric tons, which is up six percent from last year and 20 percent from the five-year average. Likewise, cassava production was estimated at 1,755,763 metric tons, which is up five percent from last year and 15 percent from the five-year average. This above-average crop production has allowed households to rebuild their stocks to normal levels and generate a normal flow of income from crop sales.  In addition, households have benefited from a highly diversified diet, which could help reduce malnutrition, whose rates are currently at normal levels in Guinea’s agricultural areas.

    Income-generating activities, such as the sale of food crops, forest products, and farm labor, continue normally and are generating average levels of household income. This is helping to improve household access to staple foods.

    Markets are functioning normally, without any formal restraints on trade and with a normal, regular supply of imported and locally grown rice. In general, prices for locally grown rice were stable between November and December. However, prices declined 11 percent on the Kindia market and eight percent in Conakry due to improving market supplies in December with the arrival of newly harvested crops on these markets. Traders reportedly have large carry-over stocks of imported rice which were not sold last year. These large carry-over stocks and government price subsidies have kept the national average price of imported rice at stable levels since the previous lean season. Prices for imported rice on all markets tracked by FEWS NET are between 4,000 and 5,000 FG/kg, which are facilitating household food access through market purchases.

    Stable prices and the continuation of seasonal economic activities, such as farm labor and the sale of crops and forest products, should improve the food access of most households during the coming months. As a result, all areas will face Minimal (IPC Phase 1) through June 2014.

    Figures Seasonal calendar in a typical year

    Figure 1

    Seasonal calendar in a typical year

    Source: FEWS NET

    Prices of locally grown rice on major markets tracked by FEWS NET (per kg)

    Figure 2

    Prices of locally grown rice on major markets tracked by FEWS NET (per kg)

    Source: SIPAG GUINEA

    Prices of imported rice on major markets tracked by FEWS NET (per kg)

    Figure 3

    Prices of imported rice on major markets tracked by FEWS NET (per kg)

    Source: SIPAG GUINEA

    Figure 4

    Source:

    In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

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