Key Message Update

Insecurity increases the number of displaced persons

July 2017

July - September 2017

Central African Republic June 2017 Food Security Projections for June to September

October 2017 - January 2018

Central African Republic June 2017 Food Security Projections for October to January

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Intercommunal conflicts have spiked in June 2017, leading to 100,000 additional displaced persons reported in the north-west, south-east, south-west and center (Ouham Pende, Nana Mambéré, Basse Kotto, Mbomou, Haut Mbomou, Haute Kotto). These new displacements increase the number of internally displaced persons to 534,000, according to OCHA.

  • The supply of commodities is below average due to the civil conflict and the heavy rains, which have led to poor road conditions in most of the country. According to WFP’s May 2017 mVAM bulletin, this situation has created a strong price variation between March and May, inducing a 92 percent increase for cassava in Carnot and a 133 percent increase for maize in Bambari. 

  • The renewed intercommunal violence continues to hinder farming activities, market functioning and humanitarian assistance, which is the main food source for displaced households and hosts in affected areas. Consequently, and despite typical agro-climatic conditions, acute food insecurity outcomes are expected to remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) for these households until at least January 2018, with consumption deficits for most households.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics