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Rainfall forecast for the 2015/16 agricultural season, issue #6

  • Seasonal Monitor
  • Southern Africa
  • April 12, 2016
Rainfall forecast for the 2015/16 agricultural season, issue #6

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  • Key Messages
  • Partner
    SADC
    Key Messages
    • The first half of February was characterized by very dry conditions in the southern half of the region, further reducing harvest expectations.

    • Very high rainfall was received between late February and mid-March in most parts of the region. The rainfall helped to increase water supply, and may improve pasture conditions. However, the rains were generally too late to improve crops that had succumbed to the hot, dry conditions in many areas.

    • Below normal rains were received in much of Tanzania, northern Malawi and northern Mozambique between late February and mid-March. Despite the dry conditions, reports indicate that good soil moisture build-up prior to the dryness allowed crops in some of these areas to survive the dry spell, and there are still good production prospects in some northeastern parts of the region.

    • A reduction in the rains in most parts of the region is expected, with the rainfall season typically ending by late-March to mid-April in most areas.

    FEWS NET’s Seasonal Monitor reports are produced for Central America and the Caribbean, West Africa, East Africa, Central Asia, and Somalia every 10-to-30 days during the region’s respective rainy season(s). Seasonal Monitors report updates on weather events (e.g., rainfall patterns) and associated impacts on ground conditions (e.g., cropping conditions, pasture and water availability), as well as the short-term rainfall forecast. Find more remote sensing information here.

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