Key Message Update

Distribution of humanitarian assistance is delayed and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes continue

November 2018

November 2018 - January 2019

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Most southern and some central areas in Malawi are experiencing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food security while the rest of the country is facing Stressed (IPC Phase 2) and Minimal (IPC Phase 1) outcomes. According to the MVAC, 3.3 million people will likely need humanitarian assistance during the lean season. These households have little to no food stocks and have below-average incomes to buy food from the market.

  • After the short-term improvement in food security outcomes from food assistance delivered in late October/beginning of November, most households are once again relying on market purchases for food. The procurement of maize and logistical costs have been secured by the government to distribute assistance through March. However, there have been delays in the delivery of assistance. Based on available information, assistance will likely be delivered in late December.

  • Maize grain prices continue to remain atypically stable for the second consecutive month due to food assistance decreasing market demand and the irrigated maize harvest. The harvest contributed to a small increase in localized maize availability. However, on average maize grain prices remain up to 60 percent higher than last year’s prices. Price stability was also recorded among other food commodities such as rice, beans, and cassava across most monitored markets.

  • The Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services (DCCMS) indicates central and southern areas are experiencing an erratic onset of rainfall, delaying land preparation and planting activities. The WRSI indicates the start of season is currently 10 days late in southern areas and yet to start in the center and northern areas. Along with the occurrence of a weak El Niño, the DCCMS also forecast dry spells in the south and central areas with flooding possible in northern areas with the forecast of average to above-average rainfall.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

USAID logoUSGS logoUSDA logo
NASA logoNOAA logoKimetrica logoChemonics logo