Key Message Update

Food prices continue to rise as more households rely on purchases for food needs

September 2015
2015-Q3-1-1-MW-en

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The MVAC’s annual assessment in July identified that approximately 2.8 million people affected by severe floods and dryness during the 2014/15 season will need humanitarian assistance between October 2015 and March 2016. Although response planning is underway, required funding for the current plan stands at only 10 percent. This gap in funding may delay in-kind distributions and cash/voucher transfers that are planned to start in October. 

  • Increased market demand, low national food supplies, and continuing depreciation of the Malawi kwacha, are all contributing to higher than average national maize prices. National maize prices in August were about 43 percent above the three-year average, and FEWS NET’s price projections indicate that average prices will be about 50 percent above the three-year average from October through December. From January through March, prices are expected to be about 40 percent above average. Prices for alternative commodities including pulses, cassava, and other cereals are likely to increase gradually by 20-40 percent between October and March.  

  • The Southern Africa Regional Climate Outlook seasonal forecast indicates that the southern half of Malawi will receive erratic and below-normal rainfall during the October to December period. These conditions will likely result in inadequate moisture for crops, which could adversely impact weeding opportunities that normally provide incomes for very poor and poor households during the lean season. From January through March, there are increased chances of normal to above-normal rainfall across the country. 

For more detailed analysis, see the Malawi Food Security Outlook for July.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics