Key Message Update

In addition to conflict, flooding is negatively affecting household food security

September 2020

September 2020

October 2020 - January 2021

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Thanks to very favorable rainfall, harvesting of millet and cowpea crops started earlier, improving food availability and agricultural employment opportunities for poor households. However, heavy rains caused widespread flooding, causing loss of assets and crops along riversides whose floods have reached unprecedented levels in the past 30 years. Food assistance to flood victims has been prompt and sufficient, keeping most households in Minimal (IPC Phase 1).

  • Food conditions in the pastoral zone improved markedly in September, leading to better body conditions of animals and an improvement in milk production. The market value of animals and their products has improved and is reflected in prices and incomes that allow improved access to food products without relying on aid and negative strategies. The majority of households remain in Minimal (IPC Phase 1) food insecurity.

  • Prices still remain atypically high, especially for dry cereals estimated at more than 40 percent above those of August 2019 and more than 20 percent compared to the five-year average due to below average supply. However, the new harvest is anticipated to reduce household dependence on the market for food consumption.

  • Crisis (Phase 3 of the IPC) persists in the northern parts of the Tillabery and Tahoua regions because of insecurity which disrupts livelihoods, displaces households, and inhibits the delivery of humanitarian assistance. In the Diffa region, households are in Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) thanks to ongoing humanitarian food assistance.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics