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Stressed and Crisis levels expected in some areas due to recent poor harvests and expected El Nino event

  • Food Security Outlook Update
  • Latin America and the Caribbean
  • May 2014
Stressed and Crisis levels expected in some areas due to recent poor harvests and expected El Nino event

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  • Key Messages
  • Key Messages
    • For the May to June period, western and eastern Guatemala, and southern and western Honduras are classified in Stress (IPC Phase 2) due to a series of shocks including two consecutive drought years in the dry corridor of Central America, and severe income losses among poor households caused by the impact of coffee rust.
    • For the July to September period, food security will deteriorate in parts of western and eastern Guatemala, reaching Crisis (IPC Phase 3). El Salvador and parts of southern and western Honduras will be Stressed (IPC Phase 2).
    • The development of an El Niño event could affect the Primera and Postrera harvests in Central America and the Spring harvests in Haiti.
    • In Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador, red bean prices increased atypically from December through April by up to 74 percent, due to below-average Primera harvests in Honduras, a decrease in area planted in Nicaragua, and increased regional export demand. Red bean prices will continue to increase until the end of the Primera harvest in August.
    • In Haiti, poor households in some communes in the Northwest, Southeast, North, Artibonite, and Nippes are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) due to winter harvest (January-February 2014) losses.

    This Food Security Outlook Update provides an analysis of current acute food insecurity conditions and any changes to FEWS NET's latest projection of acute food insecurity outcomes in the specified geography over the next six months. Learn more here.

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