Remote Monitoring Report

Locusts and conflict contribute to food insecurity

January 2014
2014-Q1-1-1-YE-en

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Not mapped
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The desert locust invasion caused substantial, if possibly localized, damage to sorghum, millet and sesame mainly in the Western Coastal Plan Sorghum, Millet and Livestock Livelihood zone.

  • Insecurity in Dammaj, northern Yemen, has led to humanitarian concerns for both old and new Internally Displaced People (IDPs).

Zone Current Anomalies Projected Anomalies
Western Coastal Plains Desert locust in the western coastal plain sorghum, millet and livestock zone caused substantial damage to sorghum, millet and sesame. Further damage to ongoing off-season or perrenial crops likely.

 

Projected Outlook through June 2014

The desert locust invasion that reached cropping areas of western Yemen in September/October 2013 caused substantial, if possibly localized, damage to sorghum, millet and sesame mainly in Western and Central Wadi Sorghum, Millet, Vegetable, Fruit and Livestock livelihood zone. Typically, sorghum and millet in this zone are planted in April/May and harvested in July after the first-season (March-May) rains. However, when the March to May rains are below average as they were in 2013, agricultural producers shift the cultivation calendar to the second-season rains (July-October) with harvests in November/December. Local sources suggest that the 2013/14 infestation is the worst since 2007, when cropping and rangeland impacts were significant.

Poor households’ agricultural production in this zone is typically very low (1-2 months’ consumption); they rely on income from agricultural wage labor to purchase food. The locust invasion is expected to contribute to food insecurity among poor households due to damage to own production, as well as loss of income due to reduced demand for agricultural labor from middle-and better-off households whose fields are equally damaged.. Labor-to-cereal terms of trade, however, remain average to good in the main port city, Hudaydah (FEWS NET’s Yemen Price Bulletin for December). As the breadth of locust damage to crops and impacts on food and income are unclear, close monitoring of food security situation is required in the coming months.

Insecurity in Dammaj, northern Yemen, has led to humanitarian concerns. Internally Displaced People (IDPs) from previous conflicts and new IDPs from the current conflict and the host community are unable to get humanitarian assistance due to ongoing conflict and restricted access. The insecurity could also disrupt access to markets in the affected areas and limit the availability of food. Detailed information is not available on food security outcomes in these areas; however, if the conflict continues, food security of the people in these areas will most likely be negatively impacted further.

About Remote Monitoring

In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics