Key Message Update

Eased import restrictions provide relief to fuel crisis, with future import financing uncertain

November 2019

November 2019 - January 2020

February - May 2020

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Not mapped
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Ongoing conflict continues to cause new displacements and disrupt livelihood activities in affected areas. Significantly above-average food prices and national cereal production estimated at 30 percent below five-year average levels are severely restricting food access for most households. About 17 million people continue to need humanitarian assistance, with much of the population facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity outcomes. A risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5) persists, and would be possible should severe disruptions to port operations or food supplies occur.

  • Increased conflict has been reported in Al Dali, Ta’izz, and southern areas of Al Hudaydah. According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), conflict in Al Dali disrupts the movement of food and humanitarian supplies between Aden and Sana’a. Tensions have eased in other parts of the south following the Riyadh agreement, though Houthi forces may be preparing for increased conflict according to analysis by ACLED. Informal peace talks between the Saudi-backed government and the Houthis have been reported, but no changes to food security outcomes are expected in the near term.

  • Severe fuel shortages attributed to new restrictions on imports were observed in Sana’a and surrounding areas in September and October. According to OXFAM, this increased food and commodity prices and restricted water access for close to 15 million people, elevating risk of diseases such as cholera. Meanwhile, UNVIM reports that the easing of restrictions observed in late October has continued, with fuel availability returning to recent average levels. According to the Sana’a Center, however, the $2 billion deposited by Saudi Arabia in early 2018 is expected to be depleted by mid-January 2020. If this occurs in the absence of additional foreign assistance, the Yemeni Rial is expected to depreciate, reducing the capacity to finance food imports and likely driving further food price increases.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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