Key Message Update

Stable wheat flour prices in December despite concerns about future food imports

January 2017

January 2017

Yemen January 2017 Food Security Projections for January

February - May 2017

Yemen January 2017 Food Security Projections for February to May

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Not mapped
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Yemen continues to face the largest food security emergency in the world, with 7 to 10 million people estimated to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse food insecurity. Of this total, at least two million people are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and face an increased risk of mortality. Given this emergency, increased levels of humanitarian assistance are needed to save lives throughout the country.   

  • Poor household purchasing power caused by elevated food prices and below-average household incomes is a key driver of limited food access observed in Yemen at this time. In December, several large wheat importers reported that they would be unable to continue wheat imports given the effects of the ongoing banking crisis on their businesses. However, despite these reports, wheat flour prices at most markets remained relatively stable in December compared to the previous month. However, the price of wheat in Al Hudaydah, a key port city where wheat enters the country, rose 7 percent (WFP).

  • According to the Task Force on Population Movement’s 12th Report, Yemen hosts approximately 2 million conflict-related IDPs, with the largest IDP populations located in Hajjah and Ta’izz governorates. According to WFP’s mVAM surveys, IDP respondents continue to report more severe food security outcomes (based on food consumption score and rCSI) in comparison to non-displaced populations. 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics