Key Message Update

Major assistance needs as conflict continues to disrupt livelihoods

September 2015
2015-Q3-1-1-YE-en

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Not mapped
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Limited availability and high prices for fuel remain major factors in most of the country, with the exception of southern governorates and especially in Aden, where petrol is available in official markets. Although verified price information for September was not yet available, local contacts indicated that petrol prices increased during the second half of September in many areas, including Amran, Hajjah, Sana’a, Sa’dah, and Al Hudaydah. The fuel crisis has contributed to major electricity shortages in Sana’a City and elsewhere, particularly since mid-August. This poses an increasing threat to the functioning of health systems and water access.

  • Despite relative improvements to the security situation in Aden and surrounding areas, including the re-opening of the port of Aden in August as well as the resumption of operations at Aden Refinery Company in late September, further improvements in health system functioning, livelihoods recovery, access to clean water, and humanitarian assistance delivery are necessary to mitigate ongoing acute food insecurity. According to an August survey conducted by Unicef and the Ministry of Public Health and Population, the prevalence of Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) in Aden was 19.2 percent (15.4 - 23.6; 95 percent C.I.).

  • In September, intensifying ground conflict in Mar’ib Governorate caused disruptions to supply routes for cooking gas to other governorates of central and northwestern parts of the country, particularly Sana’a, Amran, and Hajjah Governorates. In combination with the increased demand for cooking gas during Eid in late September, the shortages drove varied price increases in these areas, with reports indicating increases in the range of 50 percent above August levels.

  • The ongoing conflict and associated disruptions to normal livelihoods, as well as the limited availability and increased cost of key food and non-food items, continues to drive acute food insecurity throughout much of the country. At least six million people require urgent food assistance. Populations of particular concern include those trapped in active conflict areas without access to external assistance, including in Ta’izz Governorate, and those who have been displaced by the conflict.

     

    For more detailed analysis, see the Food Security Outlook for July to December 2015.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics