Skip to main content

Food ration to refugees further reduced due to funding shortfalls

  • Remote Monitoring Report
  • Tanzania
  • August 2017
Food ration to refugees further reduced due to funding shortfalls

Download the Report

  • Key Messages
  • PROJECTED OUTLOOK THROUGH JANUARY 2018
  • Key Messages
    • The Msimu and Masika harvests are complete in most parts of the country and national cereal production is estimated at 14 percent above last year, but slightly below the five-year average. Masika production in northern regions and Msimu production in central regions were below average, but Msimu production in the southern highlands was above average.

    • Food security has improved throughout the country in August with the harvest. Some poor households in northern and central regions, where production was below normal, are expected to remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) throughout 2017. However, most will be able to meet their basic food needs through market purchase, as prices are likely to decline to near normal levels and average income from the upcoming Msimu and Vuli seasons is expected.

    • According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Tanzania is hosting 348,000 refugees, about 243,000 of whom are from Burundi. WFP faces funding shortfalls and in August the maize meal and CSB plus rations were further reduced. However, it is expected that most refugees are able to meet their basic food needs through assistance and some casual labor and are Stressed (IPC Phase 2!). Funding gaps are expected to persist and it is possible WFP will progressively reduce the size of rations throughout 2017. In the absence of humanitarian assistance, it is expected refugees would be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

    ZONE

    CURRENT ANOMALIES

    PROJECTED ANOMALIES

    Northeastern bimodal areas of Arusha, Kagera, Kilimanjaro, Mara, Mwanza, Pwani, and Tanga regions

    • Well below-average July/August Masika production, estimated at 40 percent below the five-year average.
    • Poor households will likely deplete food stocks from Masika harvests in September. They will be more dependent than usual on markets between October and January, before the Vuli harvest in February, but food access will be normal due to declining, near average national food prices.

    Refugee camps in Kagera and Kigoma regions

    • In August, maize meal rations reduced to 70 percent and CSB plus to 60 percent.
    • Funding gaps are expected to persist and in the absence of additional funding WFP is likely to progressively reduce the size of rations throughout 2017. Labor opportunities and access to land for cultivation is limited among refugees, and food insecurity is likely to increase if rations are further decreased.

    Farmers in parts of transitional regions of Dodoma, Mwanza, Shinyanga, Singida, and Simiyu

    • Below-average May-July 2017 Msimu production.
    • Although production was below average in parts of these regions, above-average production in the southern highlands will support food the decline of food prices to near the five-year average. Food prices are expected to rise after September, but rise less than is seasonally typical as a result of the export ban that has led to higher domestic supply.

    PROJECTED OUTLOOK THROUGH JANUARY 2018

    Food security has improved significantly across the country in August with the end of the harvesting period. National production is estimated at 14 percent above last year, and slightly below the five-year average. However, some poor households in northeastern bimodal areas in parts of Arusha, Kagera, Kilimanjaro, Mara, Mwanza, Pwani, and Tanga had very poor Masika production, around 40 percent below average. This is the second consecutive poor season in these areas. Similarly, poor households in the unimodal central areas of Mwanza, Shinyanga, Simiyu, and Singida had poor Msimu production and are expected to deplete their food stocks early and be atypically market dependent until the next Msimu harvest in June 2018.

    However, above-average Msimu production in the highlands has supported price declines throughout the country. The retail price of maize, which was well above average in early 2017, declined nearly 30 percent between June and July in the southern highlands. Price declines have also been observed in central and northern areas. Maize prices are expected to rise somewhat after September, when households deplete stocks and market demand increases; however, price increases are expected to be less significant than usual due to the export ban imposed by the Tanzanian Government. While informal trade is anticipated to rise, the close regulation of cross-border movements is likely to discourage large-scale exports, keeping the majority of maize production in the country. Overall maize prices are projected to be below prices in 2016, but slightly above the five-year average.

    Poor households in the above mentioned unimodal and bimodal regions that experienced below-average production are expected to remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) throughout 2017, as they have lower than normal household food stocks for consumption and sale. However, it is expected that the majority will be able to meet their basic food needs by purchasing food, at near average prices, with income earned during the upcoming Msimu and Vuli land preparation and planting.

    According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Tanzania is hosting 348,000 refugees as of July 31, about 243,000 of whom are from Burundi. The number of people seeking refuge from Burundi each month has declined significantly in mid-2017, with 1,225 people arriving in July compared to about 10,000 people in January. The WFP cash-based transfer program was scaled up to 30,000 people in August, up from 10,000 in July, after a 2 million Euro cash provision from ECHO. However, WFP still faces funding shortfalls and in August maize meal rations were reduced to 70 percent of normal and CSB plus was reduced to 60 percent of normal. Although the ration is below a full ration, it is expected that most refugees are able to meet their basic food needs through a combination of assistance and some casual labor, and Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) outcomes are likely. Funding gaps are expected to persist and WFP is likely to progressively reduce the size of rations throughout 2017. In the absence of humanitarian assistance, it is expected refugees would be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). 

    Figures SEASONAL CALENDAR FOR A TYPICAL YEAR

    Figure 1

    SEASONAL CALENDAR FOR A TYPICAL YEAR

    Source: FEWS NET

    In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

    Get the latest food security updates in your inbox Sign up for emails

    The information provided on this Website is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government.

    Jump back to top