Remote Monitoring Report

Crisis (IPC Phase 3) likely in Southeast, Northwest, and Obock pastoral areas

January 2016
2015-Q4-3-1-DJ-en

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Prolonged dry conditions, including late on-set and below-average Heys-/Dadaa rains (October – February), have negatively affected rangeland conditions in Southeast, Northwest, and Obock pastoral areas. The significant depletion of herd sizes from deaths and increased sales due to the prolonged drought, as well as scarcity of labor opportunities, is limiting access to food and income for poor households in these areas.

  • As of the end of December 2015, an estimated 31,500 refugees from Yemen had entered the country. In the short-term, this has increased demand for limited casual labor opportunities available to poor households in host communities. Furthermore, labor opportunities have been adversely impacted by the recent reduction in construction projects through the government’s infrastructure development initiatives, which had boosted access to labor in previous months.

  • It is likely that household food access will continue to be limited by low livestock prices and limited milk availability due to poor livestock body conditions, as well as limited labor opportunities and the increasing cost of essential goods, including a 200 percent increase in the price of kerosene in Obock area due to disrupted trade with Yemen. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food insecurity is expected to persist through at least March 2016 for poor households in Southeast, Northwest, and Obock pastoral areas.

  • Despite the poor start to the season, the remainder of the Heys/Dadaa rains through February are expected to be near-average, which will contribute to improvement of water and pasture availability in rangelands and a slight improvement in livestock body conditions and milk production.

About Remote Monitoring

In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics