Remote Monitoring Report

Start of March to May rainfall average to above average in most areas

April 2017

April - May 2017

Djibouti April 2017 Food Security Projections for April to May

June - September 2017

Djibouti April 2017 Food Security Projections for June to September

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Most pastoralists are expected to face Stressed (IPC Phase 2) outcomes through September, although pastoralists in rainfall-deficit areas who are unable to sell sufficient livestock and milk to fund adequate food purchases are expected to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) during the July to September lean season. Pastoralist in southern roadside areas are likely to be in Minimal (IPC Phase 1) through September. 

  • The March to May Diraac/Sougum rains have so far been average to above average, but rainfall was below average in areas north of Obock City and in southeastern border areas. These areas also experienced below-average rainfall during the previous season. Livestock body conditions are improving alongside rainfall in most areas, but remain poorer than normal in the above areas where rainfall deficits persist. 

  • Staple food prices, including sorghum, wheat, and rice, have remained low and stable due to ample global supplies and below-average international prices. The combination of seasonally increasing income from livestock sales and low food prices has led to improved food access.

  • Over 24,000 refugees and asylum-seekers are currently residing in Djibouti and rely primarily on assistance through WFP to meet their basic food and non-food needs. WFP also provides assistance to school-aged children and vulnerable households. Due to funding shortages, assistance to food-insecure Djiboutian households is not guaranteed through September and in the absence of assistance, this population is likely to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).  

ZONE

CURRENT ANOMALIES

PROJECTED ANOMALIES

Southeast Pastoral-Border zone in Ali Sabieh Regions and areas north and northeast of Obock City

·    In the southeastern border areas of Ali Sabieh and northern areas of Obock City, pasture conditions remain poorer than normal due to previous below-average rainy seasons and current below-average rainfall. As a result, the sale of livestock and milk is lower than normal. 

·    Pasture resources are unlikely to fully recover. Pastoralists may migrate livestock to areas where rainfall was better, but weaker livestock will not be able to migrate. During the July to September lean season, when conditions further deteriorate, some pastoralists will be unable to sell sufficient livestock and milk to fund adequate cereal purchases and will face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food insecurity.

Individuals receiving WFP assistance: Refugees in Ali Addeh, Holl Holl, and Markazi camps, food-insecure local households

·    WFP provides food and cash-based assistance to refugees, asylum-seekers,   school-aged children, and local food-insecure households. Due to funding shortfalls, the agency has occasionally reduced the ration provided to local households.

·    Given the current political strife and food insecurity in Ethiopia, additional refugees are expected to arrive in Djibouti. If additional funding is not received, further ration reductions to local food-insecure households and refugees are possible. In the absence of assistance, these population would be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) through September.

Projected Outlook through September 2017

March rainfall during the March to May Diraac/Sougum has been average to above average in most areas of the country. The exception to this is in southeastern border areas of Ali Sabieh and Dikhil Regions, as well as in Obock Region, where rainfall was 40-60 percent below average. Pasture and water resources in these areas remain poorer than normal following previous below-average seasons, and conditions are unlikely to improve significantly given current rainfall deficits. Some pastoralists may migrate to areas where rainfall is better, but weaker livestock will not be able to migrate. During the July to September pastoral lean season, when body conditions further deteriorate, it is likely some pastoralists will be unable to sell sufficient livestock or livestock products to fund adequate cereal purchases and will face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food insecurity. Livestock conditions are likely to improve around August, following the July-September Karan/Karma rainy season and subsequent improvements to pasture and water resources.  

Due to ample global supplies and below-average international prices, the prices of staple foods (sorghum, wheat, and rice) remain low and stable. The combination of low food prices and increasing sales of livestock and milk is improving food access in most areas of Djibouti. However, seasonally low job opportunities from June to September will drive Stressed (IPC Phase 2) outcomes among some poor households.

According to UNHCR and IOM, approximately 18,000 refugees and 6,000 asylum-seekers are currently residing in Djibouti. These numbers are likely to increase through September, given current political strife and food insecurity in neighboring countries. Although Djibouti passed a law in January guaranteeing refugees’ right of movement, work, and access to services, most refugees and asylum-seekers remain heavily dependent on humanitarian assistance, due to lack of job opportunities in Djibouti. WFP, UNHCR, and UNICEF are facing significant funding gaps, which may lead them to reduce services typically provided. Due to recent funding constraints, WFP is no longer providing expensive, nutrient-rich cereal blends. Assistance to food-insecure Djiboutian households is not funded through September and in the absence of assistance, this population is likely to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).  

About Remote Monitoring

In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica.
Learn more About Us.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics