Key Message Update

Despite improvements, food gaps persist among poor households in coastal pastoral areas

January 2017

January 2017

Djibouti December 2016 Food Security Projections for February to May

February - May 2017

Djibouti January 2017 Food Security Projections for February to May

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The Xays/Daada coastal rains (October to February) have largely replenished water sources and restored rangeland conditions despite being below-average in some areas. Food security has improved significantly due to improved livestock body conditions and productivity, increasing food and income access for the predominant, rural, pastoral population, and Stressed (IPC Phase 2) outcomes persist. However, some poor households in Central Pastoral-Lowland and Southeast Pastoral-Border zones remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) as below-average rainfall this season and previous ones have caused livestock losses. 

  • Across most of Djibouti, household purchasing power has increased as incomes have risen with higher livestock and milk sales, combined with stable, staple cereal prices in most markets in December. However, households continue to spend a substantial portion of their income on food, making them vulnerable to food insecurity, especially for the poor population, who do not have stable income sources.

  • Djibouti currently hosts about 20,000 refugees from Yemen, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea, who are dependent on humanitarian assistance, mainly from WFP and UNHCR, and they remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) as they have few productive capacities. Drought conditions experienced in neighboring countries of Ethiopia and Somalia are likely to lead to refugee flows from these countries, increasing competition for limited income opportunities and humanitarian support. 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics