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Stressed (IPC Phase 2) food insecurity persists in some areas even during the harvest period

  • Remote Monitoring Report
  • Burundi
  • August 2015
Stressed (IPC Phase 2) food insecurity persists in some areas even during the harvest period

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  • Key Messages
  • Projected outlook through December 2015
  • Key Messages
    • Despite improved food availability during the Season B harvest period, food security remains Stressed (IPC Phase 2) in areas where ongoing civil unrest and insecurity have disrupted agricultural activities, reducing harvests and labor opportunities for poor households, particularly in Kirundo, Makamba, and Muyinga provinces. 

    • WFP and the Red Cross Burundi delivered a second round of general food distributions in August targeting 100,000 people in Kirundo, Makamba, and Bujumbura Marie provinces with 1,160 metric tons of food. According to WFP, current funding shortfalls will affect humanitarian operations starting in November.  

    • The September to December main lean season is expected to be more severe than normal in provinces most affected by political violence and instability. Ongoing insecurity will likely disrupt Season A planting, which typically begins in October. 


    ZONE

    CURRENT ANOMALIES

      PROJECTED ANOMALIES

    National

    • Although civil unrest has declined compared to recent months, sporadic violence continues in localized areas, particularly in Bujumbura, impacting household access to food and income.
    • Continuing civil insecurity and political violence is expected to lead to the further decline in food access, especially as the lean season peaks in November.

    National

     

     

     

    • Population migration to neighboring countries continues due to fears of escalating violence and expectations of better labor opportunities.
    • Population outflow is likely to continue in the coming months given expectations of continued instability in Burundi.

    Kirundo, Muyinga, Makamba, and Bujumbura Mairie provinces

    • Insecurity and displacement has disrupted agricultural activities and below-average Season B harvests are expected. In response to reduced access to food and income, many poor households have begun to employ coping strategies typically observed in the November peak lean season.
    • Many households will likely exhaust food stocks earlier than normal due to poor Season B production. Poor households will likely increase coping in response to earlier-than-normal reliance on markets for food and reduced income opportunities. As a result, the September to December main lean season is expected to be more severe than normal in provinces most affected by political violence and instability.  

    Projected outlook through December 2015

    Despite improved food availability during the Season B harvest period, food security remains Stressed (IPC Phase 2) in areas most affected by ongoing civil unrest and insecurity, particularly in Kirundo, Muyinga, Makamba, and Bujumbura Mairie provinces. Disruptions to agricultural activities in these areas have reduced harvests and labor opportunities for the poor and persistent insecurity has disrupted trade and reduced physical access to markets. Field reports suggest earlier-than-normal coping in Kirundo and Bujumbura Mairie where some poor households are selling more livestock than normal and other productive assets, in response to reduced food and income. Atypical labor migration and displacement to neighboring countries continues. Ongoing instability is expected to disrupt Season A planting which typically begins in October.

    Staple food prices either stabilized or declined seasonally in most markets in July due to increased cereal availability and supply from Season B harvests, and continued imports from Uganda and Tanzania. However, atypical price increases were observed in areas most affected by political instability, particularly in the north of the country. Food prices are expected to increase seasonally during the September to December main lean season.

    WFP and the Red Cross Burundi delivered a second round of general food distributions in August in the three provinces most-affected by the election crisis, targeting 75,000 people Kirundo, 30,000 in Makamba, and 350 Bujumbura Marie provinces with 1,160 metric tons of food. According to WFP, current funding shortfalls will affect humanitarian operations starting in November.  

    According to the UNHCR, as of August 25, 190,000 Burundians have fled to neighboring countries since April 2015 with Tanzania and Rwanda hosting 45 and 40 percent of refugees, respectively. However, the size of the total Burundian refugee population is likely higher as this figure does not include unregistered refugees residing with host families. Refugee and transit camps in Rwanda, Tanzania, and the DRC are operating beyond capacity, constraining access to water, sanitation, and adequate food.

    Stressed (IPC Phase 2) is expected to persist in the coming months in Kirundo, Muyinga, and Makamba provinces due to below-average Season B harvests, and the impacts of continued political instability, violence, and displacement on access to food and income.

    Figures Seasonal calendar of typical year

    Figure 1

    Seasonal calendar of typical year

    Source: FEWS NET

    Figure 1

    Source:

    In remote monitoring, a coordinator typically works from a nearby regional office. Relying on partners for data, the coordinator uses scenario development to conduct analysis and produce monthly reports. As less data may be available, remote monitoring reports may have less detail than those from countries with FEWS NET offices. Learn more about our work here.

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