Key Message Update

High prices continue to exacerbate food insecurity

March 2020

March - May 2020

June - September 2020

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Following the announcement of the confirmation of two first cases of COVID-19 in Haiti on March 19 by the Ministry of Health, the government has taken measures such as the reduction of working hours, the closing of the Haitian/Dominican borders for the transport of people (the transport of goods is maintained) and the closure of textile factories and schools. Some markets have seen a massive increase in customers, which in some cases has resulted in a moderate to large increase in prices between March 17 and 24, up to 28% increase for black peas in Cap-Haitien.

  • The socio-political situation remains calm, despite some panic movements observed in recent days in some markets and supermarkets. However, moderate inflation remains, especially in food, which continues to affect food access for the poorest households.

  • Additionally, favorable rains prompted farmers to start preparations for the spring campaign. In almost all regions, planting, particularly of pigeon peas, cassava, beans and maize is underway. This resulted in a slight rebound in demand for agricultural workers.

  • However, due to the high price of food, poor households will continue to engage in crisis and stress strategies to maintain their basic food consumption. Food insecurity in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Stress (IPC Phase 2) remains, with a gradual increase in the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) until the harvest of spring in June, after which this number is expected to decrease.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on approximately 30 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, USGS, and CHC-UCSB, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

Link to United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Link to the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) FEWS NET Data PortalLink to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Link to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth ObservatoryLink to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service, Climage Prediction CenterLink to the Climate Hazards Center - UC Santa BarbaraLink to KimetricaLink to Chemonics