Key Message Update

Start to the rainfall season has completed with early season deficits in some areas

July 2019

August - September 2019

October 2019 - January 2020

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Cumulative rainfall received through July 20th has allowed for planting in 94 percent of agricultural villages, against 97 percent of villages at the same time in 2018. The most significant areas that have yet to plant are observed in the departments of Bouza (20%), Illéla (10%), Takeyta (29%), Damagaram Takaya (20%), Tanout (11%), Banibangou (21%), Tillabéry département (18%), Diffa département (45%) and N’Guigmi (85%).

  • Markets remain well-supplied owing to well-functioning internal trade flows and a healthy level of cereal trade created by a generally good start to the agricultural season. The exception is in Diffa and Tillaberi regions, where trade flows are disturbed by the security crisis. Cereal prices were stable between May and June 2019 and are generally below the prices seen the same time last year and the five-year average, although a few markets did register price increases.

  • The onset of the rainy season provides opportunities for agricultural employment and income for poor households who also benefit from food distributions from the government and partners to meet their food needs. Apart from areas affected by the security crises, acute food insecurity is generally Minimal (IPC Phase 1), with households in some pastoral and agropastoral areas likely to remain in Stressed (IPC Phase 2) until August/September 2019 in Zinder, Maradi, Tahoua and Dosso regions.

  • The continued deterioration in the security situation continues to lead to internal displacement. An estimated 300,000 people are displaced in the regions of Diffa, Tahoua, Tillabéry and Maradi, which continue to host refugees from Nigeria and Mali. Access to food is restricted and livelihoods are impeded or abandoned by most displaced households. Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) continues in affected zones in the Diffa region, owing to the sustained humanitarian presence. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) prevails in the north of the Tillaberi region where humanitarian access is very limited.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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