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Remotely Monitored Country
Key Message Update

Poor households face a decrease in food consumption in the Extreme North region

May 2018

May 2018

June - September 2018

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • In the principle markets of the extreme north (Maroua, Kousseri, Yagoua, Kaele, Mokolo, Mora), the prices of main staple foods remained stable overall in April compared March. Overall though prices are higher than the five-year average (about 30 percent for rainfed sorghum, 40 percent for dry season sorghum, and 12 percent for maize). The ban on cereal exports and maize imports from Nigeria and sorghum and rice from Chad thanks to the opening of certain trade routes (Fotokole-Gambarou, Gobo-Guere), favors an average supply of goods at markets.

  • Continuing insecurity in the arrondissements near Lake Chad and the border with Nigeria which is characterized by attacks by Boko Haram and the theft of livestock, limits pastoralists’ transhumance from arid areas in the south where water and pasturelands are insufficient. Livestock prices remain below-average and terms of trade do not favor pastoralists. Except for the central market in Maroua, the sale of a goat in most markets does not pay enough money to purchase 50kg of cereal. At the end of this market gardening season, onion prices have improved compared to the previous month, but remain 30 percent below the five-year average in the main production areas (Mayo Kani, Mayo Tsanaga, Mayo-Sava).

  • Normally the lean season begins in June, but since mid-April, the majority of poor host households and displaced people have depended completely on markets with limited incomes. As a result, they have reduced the number of meals consumed per day from three to two. Some households have substituted rice for sorghum because of its higher price. Food distribution, in Logone-Et-Chari and Mayo-Sava Departments, is focused on refugees and some displaced people, and will reach 17 percent of the population facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) food insecurity during the period from June to September.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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