Zimbabwe flag

Presence Country
Key Message Update

Most poor households in deficit areas are expanding their coping options to cover food gaps

July 2018

July - September 2018

October 2018 - January 2019

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Farming households across most typical deficit crop-producing areas in the south, west, and extreme northern regions of the country have depleted their own-produced food stocks from the 2017-18 harvest. Some areas will transition from Stressed (IPC Phase 2) to Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes from August through the peak of the lean season in 2019. In typical surplus crop-producing areas in the north and other parts of the country, current food security outcomes are Minimal (IPC Phase 1) and Stressed (IPC Phase 2). However, from August onwards these areas will predominantly be Stressed (IPC Phase 2) because poor households will face increasing challenges in meeting their basic livelihood needs.

  • Constrained livelihoods due to the ongoing liquidity crisis continue to limit poor households’ access to food and other basic needs. Below-average incomes from crop and livestock sales, remittances, petty trade, and limited better-off households’ food stocks are affecting labor opportunities for poor households, wage-rates, as well as self-employment prospects. Across large parts of the country, some poor households are already increasing and extending their consumption and livelihood coping options, and in some cases disposing of critical productive assets to get food.

  • Most markets are now being supplied with cereal crops from the 2018 harvest. The seasonal decrease in maize grain prices following the harvests continues to be marginal. Prices in FEWS NET sentinel markets for June were $0.29/kg, which is approximately 17 percent below the five-year average.

  • Rural food insecurity during the 2018-19 lean season is expected to be above the five-year average this consumption year. In view of anticipated above-average rural food insecurity during the 2018-19 lean season, the WFP has reported that it is planning for increased support.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

USAID logoUSGS logoUSDA logo
NASA logoNOAA logoKimetrica logoChemonics logo