Key Message Update

Food access improves across the country, yet localized food gaps still exist in the south

May 2019

May 2019

Malawi projections of acute food insecurity for May 2019.

June - September 2019

Malawi projections of acute food insecurity for June - September 2019.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
National Parks/Reserves
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Minimal (IPC Phase 1) outcomes are widespread across the country with areas affected by heavy rain and flooding facing Stressed (IPC Phase 2). Some households in localized areas affected by heavy rains and flooding in March, especially in Southern Malawi, lost their livelihoods and crops. As a result, they have limited to no harvest, relying mainly on markets for food with below-average incomes and are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

  • Overall, household food access for farming households has increased as the harvest continues. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development second round crop estimates released in April, production for most staples is most likely to be above average. Overall, national maize grain production is expected to be almost 10 percent above the five-year average. Production for rice, sorghum, and groundnuts is estimated to be 17 percent, 65 percent, and 20 percent, respectively, above the five-year average. However, it is anticipated that there will be localized areas with a below-average harvest as a result of flooding destroying crops.

  • Between March and April, national maize grain price average decreased due to increased food availability and access as farming households continue to harvest. The national maize price average in April was MWK 133 per kilogram, 13 percent below March prices. However, prices on average continue to be 20 percent above the five-year average and 51 percent above the same time last year.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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