Key Message Update

A normal start of the agricultural season favored by a normal return of rains

November 2017

November 2017 - January 2018

February - May 2018

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners. FEWS NET only maps the Eastern half of DRC.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Not mapped
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners. FEWS NET only maps the Eastern half of DRC.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
Not mapped
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The agricultural Season A is beginning normally accross the South-East region, where the return of normal rainfall has favored earlier planting than usual and optimal growth of cereals, especially maize.

  • It is assumed that the harvests of Season A (January to March) will also be normal and will ensure good and sustained food availability in the region. Also, the presence of the fall armyworm (FAW) was poorly observed. This situation should point to good crop prospects with potential losses due to FAW estimated to be lower than those of previous cropping seasons (Season A-2016 and B -2017).

  • The surplus production of Zambian maize in 2017, combined with the lifting of DRC's restrictions on imports of Zambian maize, has led to good availability of this cereal in all markets in the South-East (Lubumbashi, Kolwezi and Likasi) and Central East (Kasai region). This situation has also led to price stability for grain and flour corn over the last two months, unlike the same period in 2016, when maize prices were higher. The atypical decline observed is of the order of 60 percent, currently.

  • In the Kasai region, which is at the height of the lean season, maize supplies continue to be sourced from neighboring localities, particularly from Lomami and Haut-Lomami provinces. There is also a significant commercial flow of maize flour from Zambia via the former province of Katanga. These supplies reinforce the limited availability of maize in this region, which is subject to multifaceted and protracted conflicts, with very limited purchasing power for poor households.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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