Key Message Update

An encouraging outlook thanks to a positive hiver campaign, particularly in the south

January 2018

January 2018

February - May 2018

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • In the Nord, livelihood disruptions following Irma are leading to Crisis (IPC phase 3) food insecurity outcomes in HT02 (Nord/Nord-Est). The rest of the country, including Grand-Anse and the Southern Coast that were expected to be in Crisis between February and May 2018, will be in Stress or Minimal food insecurity (IPC phase 1 and 2).

  • In the Nord-Est, the impact from Irma and heavy rains keeps disrupting agricultural activities, particularly in the lowlands. Farmers were unable to start hiver crops; harvests were inexistent, except in mountain areas: Sainte Suzanne, Mont Organisé, Carice and Vaillère. However, yields in these areas are lower than normal due to the lack of investment capacity linked to the loss of income. 

  • Above average rainfall helped the onset of hiver crops in the rest of the country and allowed harvests of beans, banana, pigeon pea, roots and tubers. Cash and Food for Work activities initiated by Oxfam and the Ministry of Agriculture in the Cayes’ lowland increased the income for the poorest households, improving their food consumption. More than 2000 families beneficiated from the program, 50% of which are located in Tiburon. 

  • Markets are well furnished in seasonal local produce but prices remain high, except for the bean (-3%). In the Nord, bean prices are high in the areas where November plantations have not been harvested yet. Imported rice prices remain stable and local maize has slightly increased (less than 3%). Imported maize price remains at two times above the price of local maize despite a recent depreciation of the gourde. 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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