Price Watch

July 2015 Global Price Watch

July 2015

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries at risk of food insecurity. The Price Watch provides an update on market and price trends in selected reference markets.  Specific trends for key reference markets and commodities are available in the Price Watch Annexes 1 and 2. FEWS NET gratefully acknowledges partner organizations, ministries of agriculture, national market information systems, the Regional Agricultural Intelligence Network, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP), and others for their assistance in providing price data.

Key Messages

  • In West Africa, market availability was adequate in June with supplies from 2014/15 harvests and international rice and wheat imports.  Regionally-produced staple food prices increased seasonally, except in areas directly and indirectly affected by conflict in northeastern Nigeria and neighboring areas, the CAR, and northern Mali. 

  • In East Africa, maize prices increased seasonally in Ethiopia, Somalia, and parts of Kenya. Maize prices were stable or began decreasing in Uganda and most of Tanzania with the onset of the May-to-August harvests.  Sorghum prices were atypically stable in Sudan as the lean season progressed, but increased seasonally in Ethiopia and Somalia. Conflict and insecurity continued to disrupt markets in parts of South Sudan, Somalia, the Darfur and South Kordofan States in Sudan, and across Yemen. 

  • In Southern Africa, regional staple food availability on markets continued increasing in June as ongoing harvests reached markets across the region. Maize production for the 2015/16 marketing year is estimated to be below-average at the regional level, including South Africa. Production is significantly below average in Malawi and Zimbabwe. Maize prices mostly followed seasonal trends, remaining stable or continuing to decrease, but began increased atypically in Malawi. Prices are above their five-year levels in every country except Tanzania. 

  • Staple food availability remained generally adequate to meet local needs throughout Central America and Haiti. However, market supplies of locally-produced maize and beans were below-average across the region due to the effects of below-average harvests over the past year. Maize and bean prices were seasonally stable throughout most of Central America, except in Honduras where white maize prices increased. Locally produced maize and bean prices increased considerably in Haiti in recent months, while imported commodity prices remained stable. 

  • In Central Asia, wheat availability remained good in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Prices remained stable in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan after increasing over the last quarter of 2014. 

  • International maize, rice, wheat, and soybean prices remained stable and below their respective 2014 levels (Figure 2). Global markets are well-supplied from record or near-record global production in 2014. Crude oil prices stabilized in June and remained below-average.

About Price Watch

Price Watch offers a monthly summary and outlook on global, regional and national trends of key commodity prices in FEWS NET countries. Analysis may touch on global issues, such as fuel prices or exchange rates, if they are likely to influence staple food prices in FEWS NET countries. The accompanying Price Watch Annex details price trends by country.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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