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Presence Country
Key Message Update

The magnitude and severity of need outpaces funded humanitarian relief plans

March 2018

March - May 2018

June - September 2018

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) persist  in all regions of South Sudan, though assistance is preventing more extreme outcomes in several counties. Many households have depleted their food stocks and are reliant on wild foods and fish, which will become less available over the coming months. Despite the expectation of continued assistance delivery, not all households will be reached and some are likely to face Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5).

  • Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes are expected to continue in the most likely scenario, with continued humanitarian assistance preventing more extreme outcomes. However, in a worst-case scenario characterized by a persistent absence of assistance, Famine (IPC Phase 5) would be expected. Central and southern Unity, northwestern Jonglei, and Wau of Western Bahr el Ghazal remain of greatest concern. Additionally, Kapoeta East of Eastern Equatoria is of increasing concern, as livestock are away from homesteads, many households are unable to afford staple foods, and insecurity is preventing the delivery of assistance to several areas, incuding Jie, Mogos, and Kauto.

  • FEWS NET’s Food Security Outlook for February to September 2018 and the IPC’s January 2018 analysis assumed the continuation of assistance in many counties of Greater Upper Nile. In these counties, distribution data from January and February indicate the majority of planned beneficiaries were reached, though with variations across counties. Data on deliveries in March are not yet available. Throughout South Sudan, roughly 900,000 people were reached with general food distributions in January and 1.05 million in February, lower than the number of beneficiaries reached at the same time last year. Given that 6-7 million people are expected to be in need during the projection period, assistance above currently planned and funded levels is needed throughout the projection period to save lives and protect livelihoods. 

  • Conflict continues to cause displacement and disrupt trade flows and market functioning. In Upper Nile, armed clashes in late March in Fashoda and Nasir are disrupting trade flows through Sobat River. As a result, market supplies in local markets are very low, driving food price increases above already extreme levels. Armed clashes between Government forces and armed opposition in mid-March in Lasu of Yei displaced an estimated 1,000 people. Conversely, trade flows along the Kaya-Yei road of Central Equaroria, Magwi-Torit road of Eastern Equatoria, and Renk-Melut/Malakal roads of Upper Nile have improved compared to previous months as a result of relative calm.

  • In Greater Equatoria, first-season cultivation is ongoing in several areas. In Magwi and highland areas of Budi, some farmers have already planted. In parts of Yei and Lainya, some planting of first-season crops is also occurring, though insecurity and lack of seeds and tools is limiting the area under cultivation. Rainfall in March has been above average, and there is an increased risk of greater than normal levels of flooding between March and September.    

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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