Special Report

Nutrition, Mortality, Food Security, and Livelihoods Survey Based on SMART Methodology

August 2015

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Guatemala comprises up to 20 different livelihood zones (LHZ), and 54.9 percent of its population lives in rural areas. Its Dry Corridor suffered a long-term drought in 2014, with no rain during 45 consecutive days in some regions. This drought occurred after the sowing season and was preceded by three years of irregular rains in the region, which increased households’ vulnerability to food insecurity and depleted their coping mechanisms. In addition to the 2014 drought, a rust disease affected coffee crops, reducing the number of laborers hired for the harvest.

To assess the nutritional status of children 0-59 months of age and the mortality, health, and food security situation of rural households in Guatemala’s Dry Corridor (stratified into LHZ 5 in the Western stratum and LHZ 7, 8, and 9 in the Eastern stratum), a Nutrition, Mortality, Food Security, and Livelihoods Survey was conducted between March 11-27, 2015. The survey was a FEWS NET initiative implemented by Action Contre la Faim (ACF). A brief summary of the findings follows. 

Acute malnutrition

The prevalence of wasting was low in both strata. Boys were more affected than girls in the Western stratum, however. 

Stunting

Both strata showed exceptionally high levels of stunting, and the prevalence of stunting was higher among children 24-59 months of age. 

Breastfeeding practices

  • Nearly 50 percent of children under six months of age were not exclusively breastfed.
  • Meal frequency was low among children 6- 23 months of age.
  • The vast majority of children 6-23 months of age did not receive a minimum acceptable diet 

Mortality 

The Crude Death Rate (CDR) in the Western and Eastern strata was 0.05 deaths/10,000 people/day and 0.33 deaths/10,000 people/day, respectively. The Under-five Death Rate (U5DR) in the Western and Eastern strata was 0.42 deaths/10,000 children under five years/day, and 0.27 deaths/10,000 children under five years/day, respectively. 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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